Early Years

OUR EDUCATIONAL APPROACH

 

Our Early Years programme offers an opportunity to share knowledge, memories and experiences to last a life time.

The period between 3 and 5 is recognised as a distinct stage of learning when children learn best through active play and investigation, which builds on their individual needs and interests.

We know that young children have a wide range of different experiences, skills and interests when they join a setting or school at age three, four or five. They need a well planned and resourced curriculum to take their learning forward and to provide opportunities for them to succeed in an atmosphere of care and in a place where they feel valued.

Our Early Learning Programme is organised to provide educational development in the following areas

  • Social and personal learning: Your child will learn to be self –confident, take an interest in things, know what their own needs are, tell the difference between right and wrong, and to be able to dress and undress. They will also learn to take responsibility.
  • Language learning and communication: Your child will learn to talk confidently and clearly, enjoying stories, songs and poems, hearing and saying sounds, and linking them to the alphabet. With time, they will read and write some familiar words and learn to use a pencil.
  • Early mathematical understanding: Your child will develop an understanding of Maths through stories, songs, games and imaginative play. They will become comfortable with numbers and with ideas such as ‘heavier than ’ or ‘bigger’. They will be aware of shapes and space.
  • Knowledge and understanding of the world: Your child will explore and find out about the world around them, asking questions about it. They will build with different materials, know about everyday technology, and learn what it is used for. They will find out about past events in their lives, and in their families. They will find out about different cultures and beliefs.
  • Creative development: In terms of creative development your child will explore colours and shapes, trying out dance, making things, telling stories and making music.
  • Health and physical learning: Your child will learn to move and control their body with confidence as well as the equipment that may be involved.

These goals do not put pressure on your child as most of the time they feel they are just playing and having fun. Sometimes they choose what they want to do. At other times they take part in activities that help them learn how to concentrate or develop a particular skill.

Nursery

3 years

Early Years 1

4 years

Early Years 2

5 years

'A note from the director '

It is good now and then to remind ourselves that the sweet cuddly kids we have in Early Years  are essentially strong, rich and capable! They have a sense of preparedness, potential , natural curiousity and interest in constructing their learning, negotiating with everything their environment brings.

 

Especially in the period in a child’s life between 2 and 5 years it is recognised as a distinct stage of learning when children learn best through active play and investigation which builds on their individual needs and interests.

 

We know that young children have a wide range of different experiences, skills and interests when they join a school at age three, four or five. They need us to provide them with planned and resourced curriculum to take their learning forward and to give them opportunities for them to succeed in in an atmosphere of care and in a place where they feel valued.

 

John Lees

Director of Teaching and Learning

"A note from the director"

It is good now and then to remind ourselves that the sweet cuddly kids we have in Early Years  are essentially strong, rich and capable! They have a sense of preparedness, potential , natural curiousity and interest in constructing their learning, negotiating with everything their environment brings.

Especially in the period in a child’s life between 2 and 5 years it is recognised as a distinct stage of learning when children learn best through active play and investigation which builds on their individual needs and interests.

We know that young children have a wide range of different experiences, skills and interests when they join a school at age three, four or five. They need us to provide them with planned and resourced curriculum to take their learning forward and to give them opportunities for them to succeed in in an atmosphere of care and in a place where they feel valued.

John Lees
Director of Teaching and Learning